Virtual 1 Oral Abstracts
Oct 29, 2020 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM (Africa/Harare) Switch to local time
20201029T0900 20201029T1100 Africa/Harare Innovative approaches, practices and technologies for affordable water supply, and sanitation services

Limited access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation is a global problem, but one which is particularly huge in Africa in general and Eastern and Southern Africa in particular. An estimated 40% of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa and approximately the same population in Eastern and Southern Africa have limited access to clean drinking water. Africa lags behind other continents in the area of access to improved sanitation which stands at 31% of the population. In Southern Africa, 62% of the population, i.e. almost two thirds of the total population - lack access to basic sanitation. As a result of limited access to clean water supply and sanitation in Sub-Saharan Africa, 842 000 adults and 120,000 children under the age of five die every year in the region from diarrhoea caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation. Cholera outbreaks have been experienced in the SADC region in recent years. The health of members of society is highly dependent on both the quality and the availability of water, and on how well this precious resource is managed.

With regards to sanitation, wastewater treatment, Africa has not been able to keep pace with rapid population growth and urbanization. Population growth, urbanisation and relative improvement in lifestyles in Africa have resulted in a rise in water consumption and an increase in discharge of wastewater. Untreated wastewater pollutes surface and groundwater and may lead to a myriad of diseases and illnesses resulting in deaths of the young and the elderly and vulnerable people. Africa treats only 1% of wastewater to secondary level. There is an urgent need for appropriate technologies for treating wastewater, including considering wastewater as a useful resour ...

Virtual 1 21st WaterNet/WARFSA/GWPSA Symposium waternet@waternetonline.org

Limited access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation is a global problem, but one which is particularly huge in Africa in general and Eastern and Southern Africa in particular. An estimated 40% of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa and approximately the same population in Eastern and Southern Africa have limited access to clean drinking water. Africa lags behind other continents in the area of access to improved sanitation which stands at 31% of the population. In Southern Africa, 62% of the population, i.e. almost two thirds of the total population - lack access to basic sanitation. As a result of limited access to clean water supply and sanitation in Sub-Saharan Africa, 842 000 adults and 120,000 children under the age of five die every year in the region from diarrhoea caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation. Cholera outbreaks have been experienced in the SADC region in recent years. The health of members of society is highly dependent on both the quality and the availability of water, and on how well this precious resource is managed.

With regards to sanitation, wastewater treatment, Africa has not been able to keep pace with rapid population growth and urbanization. Population growth, urbanisation and relative improvement in lifestyles in Africa have resulted in a rise in water consumption and an increase in discharge of wastewater. Untreated wastewater pollutes surface and groundwater and may lead to a myriad of diseases and illnesses resulting in deaths of the young and the elderly and vulnerable people. Africa treats only 1% of wastewater to secondary level. There is an urgent need for appropriate technologies for treating wastewater, including considering wastewater as a useful resource which can be recycled and used for productive purposes. In addition, solid waste is not collected systematically or using proper disposal methods and poses a health hazard to residents and the environment. New and innovative approaches are required in the area of wastewater management to alleviate these challenges. Ensuring access to clean water supply and improved sanitation in Eastern and Southern Africa will go a long way in achieving a number of the sustainable development goals such as poverty eradication and hunger (goals 1 and 2), good health and wellbeing (goal 3), quality education (goal 4), gender equality (goal 5), clean water and sanitation (goal 6), reducing inequality (goal 10) and sustainable cities and communities (goal 11). There is also a need to come up with innovative approaches, practices and technologies in order to achieve adequate water supply and sanitation services for all. The challenge is to identify affordable technologies that are appropriate and accepted by the intended beneficiaries across Eastern and Southern African regions. 

Papers in this sub-theme address sustainable water supply and sanitation development, technological advances in water supply, reuse and recycling, sanitation, water utility management and linkages to public health.


University of Johannesburg
Researcher and Consulting Engineer
University of the Western Cape
Poster Presenter
Namibia University of Science and Technology
speaker
University of Zimbabwe
Presenter
University of Zimbabwe
SPEAKER
+ 4 more speakers. View All
Dr. Goden Mabaya
WaterNet
Administrator
Blantyre Water Board
Engineer
Ms. Catherine Tlotlo Kerapetse
WaterNet
Research Officer
University of Western Cape
Presenter
National Hydrological Services
Deputy Director Namibia Hydrological Services
+ 40 more attendees. View All